Friday, August 3, 2012

Abok-Abok / Glutinous Rice Cakes


abok-abok

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It has been years since I last had these... almost 35 years!!!

I called this Abok-Abok ... Abok or Abuk or Habuk means 'Dust' in Malay. 
The Southern part of Malaysia would call these Tepung Gomak... stand to be corrected here...

The 'Old' me ~ never learn how to appreciate the traditional Malay kuih (savoury or sweet finger food)... especially the ones with glutinous rice flour. I disliked the gummy chewable texture.raised eyebrows

Mom used to make these little bites for our iftar (break fast)... and I would have none, nevertheless, I'd helped her with the preparation. She started off with pan roasting the mung beans until the beans turned green-goldenish in colour. Smashed the beans and separate the beans from its membrane.... then grind into powder form or flour.

My task was to 'fish' out these discs, filled and sealed with sweet coconut, from the pot of boiling water onto the plate filled with mung beans flour and 'Dust' each disc thoroughly...by rolling the discs into the flour...


Fast forward ...
The 'Current' me ~ had a sudden craving for these little bites. I must have been in that 'reminiscing' mood again... plus my kids hadn't a clue what Abok-Abok is... I don't know

I decided to give Abok-Abok a second try... but I didn't go through the laborious work of grinding mung beans into flour form... I used the pre-packed mung beans flour and fry the flour till I have that aroma and taste... 


Confession 
.... Its not that bad after 35 years.. I thought that I could only manage with 1 piece of the Abok-Abok... but...
I had 5 actually... hee hee


The only person who was reluctant to give it a go and was pulling a long face ~ was E...
hmmm ..confused "Deja Vue moments"...thinking.where did I see that 'look' before?
ooops...blushing it was me 35 years ago.

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Recipe
(yield ~ 20 pieces)

Dough
3 cups of glutinous flour
1 cup coconut milk
1/2 cup water
1 teaspoon of salt
Coconut Filling
90g palm sugar
1 teaspoon cornflour
1-1 1/2 cup dessicated coconut
1 knotted pandan leaf
1/4 cup of water
1 - 2 cups of mungbean flour
  1. Dry fry the mung bean flour until it is light, with a tinge of yellow and aromatic (uncooked mung bean flour doesn't taste nice). Set aside to cool. 
  2. Add knotted pandan leaf, palm sugar and water in a small pan, bring to boil, stir until the sugar has dissolved, then add dessicated coconut. Mix well. Sprinkle corn flour and  mix well until the mixture thicken. Set aside.
  3. Mix glutinous rice flour, coconut milk, water, salt until they are well combined into a dough. Dough must not be too dry or sticky. 
  4. Bring about 1 liter of water to boil (in a saucepan). 
  5. Roll into a 1 inch ball or bigger. 
  6. Flatten into a disc. 
  7. Spoon about 1 to 2  teaspoons of coconut filling. 
  8. Fold in 2, seal, enclosing the coconut filling. Gently shape into a ball (by pushing the 2 ends of the semi-circle together) and flatten into a disc again.
  9. Gently place uncooked Abok-Abok into the boiling water. 
  10. The cake will float when it is cook. 
  11. Dish it out and roll in the mung bean flour.  
  12. Serve immediately.


18 comments:

  1. Haha @ E..

    OMG.. my favorite.. lama x makan...

    Eh..I called them kuih tepung Gomak.. for us, the southerners (ha ha), abok-abok refers to the one made with sagu and wrapped with banana leaves..the one in triangle shape.. he he

    Thanks for sharing it here.. I might give it a try one of these days.. :)

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  2. I know I will enjoy having this type of snack. In olden days it must be hard work to make this but nowadays it is easy to get all the ingredients at the shop. Well, may be "E" will enjoy this 35 years later?

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  3. They look so tempting!
    I on the other hand love anything kuih made with glutinous rice flour specifically because of its chewy nature :-).
    I have this kuih in my 'to make' list for Ramadhan but Im still too lazy to make them :-).

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  4. Hi Lisa, your abok abok look awesome and lovely presentation. Looks like I've not eaten this since I left school. Thanks for refreshing me on this.

    Have a nice weekend, regards.

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  5. Those look delicious! I love glutinous rice treats and those look irresistible.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  6. Ribbon Clown
    Very confusingkan...
    Another confusing one ~
    your Kuih bom is our Onde-onde ��

    Mel
    We want fast and easy... ��

    Lemongrass
    LOL... me too, so tak rajin, after 2 weeks of Ramadan, this is the only kuih I made for iftar...☺

    Amelia
    Has to let the younger generations to taste Kuih-muih lama ��

    Rosa
    thank you ��

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  7. I was trying to figure out what is abok-abok to Indonesian kue but whenever I google it refers me to the one that Ribbon Clown said. The abok-abok of Ribbon Clown said refers to kue lapek bugis. This one is also called tepung gomak in Riau.

    Whatever it's called I would love to have it for my iftar

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  8. They are new to me. But I do love food made with glutinous rice.

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  9. mmm... yummy looking rice cakes.

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  10. These are beautiful glutinous rice cakes and I love the name - sounds so cute! Must be very nostalgic feeling to eat these after 35 years!

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  11. Ohhhh I never heard of this Malay kuih until now but did grow up with a very similar kind of "Chinese kuih" where the filling is crushed peanuts with sugar. I LOVED that and I'm sure I'd love these too. I like reading and learning about other cultures a lot because I always try and make them to surprise my friends of that culture. Always makes everyone very happy. My friend bought sooo many kuih for us last year during Ramadan to share with us and it felt so special, appreciated it a lot. Thanks again for another awesome recipe. LOVE your blog so much lah!

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  12. This is perhaps the kueh I would never try to make even in my wildest dream! Ntahlah tak tau kenapa belum teringin nak try. I can't take pulut in whatever form so since this is made from tepung pulut, it gives me a strong excuse not to try. But my hsbd lovessssss this. Awak sgt rajin la!

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  13. Pepy
    :D... it'll be interesting if we could find out the origin of these traditional bites :D

    Angie
    :D

    Zareena
    Thank you :)

    Nami
    I am mellowing as I age :)

    Winston
    Terimakasih banyak2 la young man :)

    Wiz
    Bukan rajin la Wiz... dah kempunan kena buat sendiri. Tak ada kuih muih 'tunjuk' kat sini ;P
    missed Pasar Ramadan kat Bangi :(

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  14. My favorite, I wish I can have some now.

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  15. I've never heard of this, but these cookies are so gorgeous! I've never worked with some of these ingredients but that makes it even better!

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  16. wow great job these look amazing did you used to live there?

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  17. I think it's funny how we didn't eat certain food as a kid when Mom used to make it and now that we didn't get it , we start craving for it and land up making it on our own :)

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  18. Looks great!! just happen to drop by your blog for the first time... and find it very very interesting and lots of food... This snack is really tempting to me now!! Haha

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